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Dick Ellis Blog:
4/5/2022
Please connect with this link to read all of On Wisconsin Outdoors reporting on the wolf issue over 2021/22.  We will continue our work and our commitment to bring you nothing but the truth to the best of our ability. To have a PDF of our work e-mailed directly to you, please e-mail us at ellis@onwisconsinoutdoors.com. You are welcome to share this link or our PDF with anyone concerned with wolf management in Wisconsin or the future of ...
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Reports of Dead Fish on the Winnebago Lakes and Little Lake Butte des Morts

Dead fish on Winnebago Lakes and Little Lake Butte Des MortsI have received numerous calls about the "fish kill" on the Winnebago lakes and Little Lake Butte des Morts.   These are not white bass as some have reported - these fish are dead adult gizzard shad (similar to the situation we experienced in the winter 2007-08 (see attached DNR photo). Gizzard shad are occasionally abundant in the Winnebago lakes typically as yearlings (see attached DNR photo).

The species has a natural winter die-off every year. The main differences from year to year are the amount of shad in the system and the size.  We had a large natural hatch of shad in 2010, which are now adult size, and they died this past winter as they always do every year under the ice. The ice went out early and the fact that these were adult shad (vs what we normally see - yearlings or much smaller shad) prevented them from mostly decaying under the ice or drying up on shore before they made a stinky mess on the shorelines. We get calls every spring from people about dead shad after ice out, more in some years and less in others, again depending on the abundance of shad in the system.   We are going to attempt to collect some fresh dead or dying shad (although we are not likely to be able to do this as they die under the ice each winter).  If we do find any we will have them tested for fish diseases including VHS virus.  Hopes this helps if you were wondering about the dead fish.

adult gizzard shad

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