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Dick Ellis Blog:
6/30/2021
WHO SUPPORTS A WOLF GOAL OF 350 OR LESS IN WISCONSIN? Thirty-six Wisconsin County Boards have passed resolutions supporting a wolf goal of 350 (7) or 350 or less (26), 100 or less (1), 80 or less (1), or 50 or less (1).  The votes: Barron, Burnett, Vilas, Taylor, Florence, Forest, Iron, Jackson, Lincoln, Marinette, Oconto, Oneida, Price, Shawano, Waushara, Waupaca, Grant all passed unanimously, Adams, 16 for, 2 ag...
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Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Weekly Digest Bulletin

NEWS RELEASE: DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of City Of Green Lake Safe Drinking Water And Clean Water Project
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 13, 2021
Contact: Kevin Olson, DNR Community Financial Assistance Specialist
Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov or 608-234-2238

 

DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of City Of Green Lake Safe Drinking
Water And Clean Water Project

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the City of Green Lake is an applicant for funding through the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) and Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP) to address deficiencies in its public drinking water and wastewater systems.

The project includes the replacement of watermains on Illinois Avenue from Lake Street to Lac Verde Circle and related areas in the City of Green Lake.

Activities related to this project are minor actions under Chapter NR 150, Wis. Admin. Code, for which no environmental analysis is required; however, following the SDWLP federal requirement 40 C.F.R. §35.3580, an environmental review must be conducted before funding this project.

The SDWLP has determined that the project will not result in significant adverse environmental effects, and no further environmental review or analysis is needed before proceeding with funding the project.

The public is encouraged to submit comments regarding this decision and the potential environmental impacts of this project. Submit comments by Sept. 27, 2021, to:

Department of Natural Resources
C/O Kevin Olson, Community Financial Assistance, CF/2
101 S Webster St.
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: 608-234-2238 or Email: Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov

Based on the comments received, the SDWLP may prepare an environmental analysis before proceeding with the funding process. The analysis would summarize the DNR’s consideration of the project's impacts and reasonable alternatives.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Reminder: ‘Threats On Tap: Marginalized Communities’ Webinar Sept. 15
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 14, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov

Reminder: ‘Threats On Tap: Marginalized Communities’ Webinar Sept. 15

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is reminding the public that the second of three Safe Water For All educational webinars, Threats on Tap: Marginalized Communities, will take place 11 a.m.–12 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 15. 

The webinar series is part of the Safe Water For All Campaign announced in July that is dedicated to educating the public on the leading drinking water contaminants, including PFAS, nitrates, lead and their impact on your health.   

While the Safe Drinking Water Act guarantees all Wisconsinites access to clean, drinkable water, not everyone can safely turn on the tap. The United States has remarkable water systems, developed over two centuries of technological, institutional and economic advances. However, the benefits of those systems have not been equally felt across the state.

Panelists will discuss environmental justice and water safety issues facing marginalized areas – communities of color, low-income communities and rural communities. Panelists will also share ideas for actions government agencies and the public can take to help ensure safe and affordable drinking water for all.

Speakers include Regina Strong, environmental justice public advocate in Michigan’s Office of Environmental Justice, Brenda Coley, co-executive director of Milwaukee Water Commons, a nonprofit organization, and Margaret Ann Noodin, director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. Maria Redmond, director of the Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy in the Wisconsin Department of Administration, will moderate the session.

Gov. Tony Evers declared 2019 the Year of Clean Drinking Water to address the fact that not all Wisconsinites have access to safe, clean drinking water. Gov. Evers directed the DNR and DHS, the agencies entrusted with protecting Wisconsin’s health and water resources, to strengthen water quality standards for nitrate, PFAS and lead. 


Safe Water For All Panel Series

 

Threats On Tap - Marginalized Communities At Risk
11 a.m. Sept. 15
While the Safe Drinking Water Act guarantees all Wisconsinites access to clean, drinkable water, not everyone can safely turn on the tap. The United States has remarkable water systems, developed over two centuries of technological, institutional and economic advances. However, the benefits of those systems have not been equally felt across the state. Water systems that serve marginalized areas – communities of color, low-income communities and rural communities – are more likely to be unsafe. Hear about the efforts to understand and to secure safe and affordable drinking water for every community.

Speakers:
Brenda Coley, Co-Executive Director, Milwaukee Water Commons
Margaret Ann Noodin, Director, Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education, UW-Milwaukee
Maria Redmond, Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy Director, Wisconsin Department of Administration
Regina Strong, Environmental Justice Public Advocate, Michigan Office of Environmental Justice, Michigan's Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy

Watch via the DNR’s YouTube channel here.

 

Protecting The People - Safe Water For All
12 p.m. Oct. 12
Wisconsin has a long history of protecting the state's waters and even led the nation in drinking water protection with the passage of the 1983 groundwater law. Approximately two-thirds of people living in Wisconsin get their drinking water from groundwater. Adequate supplies of uncontaminated groundwater are crucial not only for our health but also for our breweries, agricultural operations and cutting-edge industries in Wisconsin. Hear how Wisconsin is working to protect your health and what you can do to get involved.

Speakers:
Jennifer Hauxwell, Associate Director, UW-Madison Aquatic Sciences Center
Jon Meiman, Chief Medical Officer and State Occupational and Environmental Disease Epidemiologist, Wisconsin Dept. of Health Services
Bruce Rheineck, DNR Groundwater Section Chief

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of City Of Greenwood Safe Drinking Water Loan Program Project
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 15, 2021
Contact: Kevin Olson, DNR Community Financial Assistance Specialist
Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov or 608-234-2238

DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of City Of Greenwood Safe Drinking
Water Loan Program Project

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the City of Greenwood is an applicant for funding through the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) to address deficiencies in its public drinking water system.

The project primarily focuses on the installation of a second transmission main to improve the water distribution system in the City of Greenwood.

Activities related to this project are minor actions under Chapter NR 150, Wis. Admin. Code, for which no environmental analysis is required; however, following the SDWLP federal requirement 40 C.F.R. §35.3580, an environmental review must be conducted before funding this project.

The SDWLP has determined that the project will not result in significant adverse environmental effects, and no further environmental review or analysis is needed before proceeding with funding the project.

The public is encouraged to submit comments regarding this decision and the potential environmental impacts of this project. Submit comments by Sept. 29, 2021 to:

Department of Natural Resources
C/O Kevin Olson, Community Financial Assistance, CF/2
101 S Webster St.
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: 608-234-2238 or Email: Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov

Based on the comments received, the SDWLP may prepare an environmental analysis before proceeding with the funding process. The analysis would summarize the DNR’s consideration of the project's impacts and reasonable alternatives.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Seeking Public Comments On Green Tier Application For Wisconsin Specialty Recycling
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 15, 2021
Contact: Weston Wegener, DNR Business Support Coordinator
Weston.Wegener@Wisconsin.gov or 608-284-0908

DNR Seeking Public Comments On Green Tier Application For Wisconsin Specialty Recycling

 

An image of the Wisconsin Specialty Recycling's Slinger, Wisconsin facility.

The DNR is seeking public comments on a Green Tier application proposal covering sustainability activities at the Wisconsin Specialty Recycling facility in Slinger, Wisconsin. / Photo Credit: Wisconsin Specialty Recycling

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is seeking public comments on a Green Tier application proposal covering sustainability activities at the Wisconsin Specialty Recycling (WISR) facility on West Commerce Boulevard in Slinger. If the application is accepted, WISR is approved to join Tier 1 of the Green Tier program.

The DNR welcomes comments from WISR’s customers, neighbors and stakeholders through Oct. 15, 2021.

Tier 1 of the Green Tier Program is designed to encourage, recognize and reward companies committed to superior environmental performance. Applicants must have a good environmental record and agree to implement an environmental management system, which will be used to set goals, assess progress and identify opportunities for improvement. Participants must have that system audited regularly and set goals and objectives aimed toward maintaining superior environmental performance.

WISR remarkets viable products by working with non-profits and USA-based information technologies companies to provide electronic components, computers and internet service to countries and rural areas worldwide. The company’s unique business model prioritizes the reuse and upcycling of electronic devices and components in a concerted effort to reduce the stream of end-of-life e-waste.

"Our mission is to reduce electronic waste stream environmental impact through remarketing, repair capability and customer awareness,” said Tristan Myhre, Owner of WISR.

WISR is pursuing sustainability through reduction and reuse, then recycling; operating to create a system in which there are steps along the way to maximize reuse, even with collectible and vintage parts.

WISR is developing an environmental management system to gain certification to the ISO 14001 standard within the first year of joining Green Tier. Future goals include conducting energy audits to monitor and improve energy use, improving building efficiencies for heating and cooling and implementing a full solar installation by 2025, with a self-contained battery system sourced from recycled e-waste.

The DNR will accept written comments until Oct. 15, 2021. Direct comments to Weston Wegener at weston.wegener@wisconsin.gov or 608-284-0908.

For more information, please visit the Green Tier webpage for Wisconsin Specialty Recycling.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Find Your Adventure: Explore Wisconsin’s Amazing Fall Foliage
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 15, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov

Find Your Adventure:
Explore Wisconsin’s Amazing Fall Foliage

Door County, Wisconsin, the beauty of autumn

Wisconsin state forests, parks and trails offer excellent vantage points to view fall colors as shown in this photo taken in Door County. / Photo Credit: iStock/MONISHA MALLI SRIDHARAN

ASHLAND, Wis. – Autumn in Wisconsin is all about the color. The beauty is breathtaking, and you’ve got to see it to believe it. With over 6 million acres of public lands, 49 state parks, 15 state forests, 44 state biking trails plus hundreds of lakes and rivers to explore, Wisconsin has a fall leaf-peeping spot for everyone.

The state’s combination of tree species and climate produce vivid fall foliage, leaving residents and visitors alike looking forward to the annual fall color show. From urban parks to colorful country roads, Wisconsin is packed with color-spotting opportunities throughout the fall season. Check out these 11 scenic drives to experience fall from Travel Wisconsin.

Color changes typically occur in far northern Wisconsin during the last week of September and first week of October, with color peaking during mid-October in central Wisconsin and the latter half of October in southern Wisconsin. Timing of the color change varies by species and weather conditions.

"To have the most brilliant and vibrant fall color display, a series of fall days filled with bright sunshine and cool, but frost-free, evenings are ideal," said Colleen Matula, DNR Forest Ecologist/Silviculturist. “Cooler nighttime temperatures tend to amplify the brightness of reds and purple in leaves, while warmer nights will mute this color change.”

Discover the fall colors in Wisconsin with the official Travel Wisconsin Fall Color Report.

Warmer temperatures, especially in the evening, tend to delay fall color because the trees are not getting the signal that fall has arrived. Fall color predictions by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are based on mathematical algorithms that factor in historical leaf peak, temperatures, precipitation, leaf volume, health and day length.

While forests in central and Northeast Wisconsin are right on target, counties in Northwest Wisconsin and the far southern part of the state are encountering drought conditions that may impact fall color in those parts of the state.

The intensity and duration of fall color is affected by spring and summer growing conditions. Severe to abnormal drought in the growing season usually makes the tree leaves change color earlier and the color lasts for a shorter period. In some cases, trees may skip the color change altogether with leaves turning brown before falling.

For more information on the science of fall colors, visit this DNR website.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR To Monitor CWD Samples In Northeastern Counties, Other Focus Areas
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 14, 2021
Contact: Amanda Kamps, DNR Wildlife Health Conservation Specialist
Amanda.Kamps@wisconsin.gov or 608-712-5280

DNR To Monitor CWD Samples In Northeastern Counties, Other Focus Areas

 

A graphic of a chronic wasting disease (CWD) map.

Hunters in northeast Wisconsin are especially encouraged to have their adult tested for CWD this year. / Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is asking deer hunters to help monitor chronic wasting disease (CWD) in northeast Wisconsin and surrounding counties.

This year’s monitoring will complete multi-year, statwide CWD sampling efforts that began in 2018. The northeast counties included in this effort are Brown, Calumet, Door, Green Lake, Fond du Lac, Kewaunee, Manitowoc, Marinette, Oconto, Outagamie, Waupaca, Waushara and Winnebago.

The DNR has made CWD testing available and accessible to every hunter in the state by offering free testing and various options to make the sample drop-off process fast and convenient for hunters. Active CWD sampling efforts are currently underway in counties where CWD has already been found.

“We especially encourage hunters in northeast Wisconsin and around our other CWD surveillance areas to get their adult deer tested this season,” said Amanda Kamps, DNR Wildlife Health Conservation Specialist. “Each test result helps us better understand CWD distribution.”

The DNR offers four easy ways to submit a sample and an online map to find sampling locations near you. Be sure to check the map of sampling locations regularly to see additional options as they become available.

  • Self-service kiosks open 24/7 Kiosks have supplies for hunters to drop off their adult deer’s head with 5 inches of neck attached for testing. Check the DNR’s CWD sampling page before your hunt to find a location near you.
  • In-person with cooperating meat processors, taxidermists and other businesses Visit a cooperating partner for assistance with CWD testing.
  • At-home lymph node sampling Hunters can extract the retropharyngeal lymph nodes using an instruction kit provided by the DNR and return them to the DNR for testing. Contact your local wildlife biologist to get a kit.
  • By appointment with local DNR staff Hunters can contact their local wildlife biologist to schedule an in-person appointment.

Hunters are encouraged to use the DNR’s new online form to register your deer, find a CWD sampling location and enter information on your harvest. The online form automatically fills in your name, contact information, customer ID number and harvest registration number and includes an interactive map to drop a pin on your harvest location. Submitted registration information is available in your Go Wild harvest history.

For more information, visit the DNR’s CWD webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Successful Landing Blitz Helps Prevent Spread Of Invasive Species In Wisconsin Waters
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 16, 2021
Contact: Erin McFarlane, Statewide CBCW Educator Extension Lakes
erin.mcfarlane@uwsp.edu or 715-346-4978

 

Successful Landing Blitz Helps Prevent Spread
Of Invasive Species In Wisconsin Waters

 

volunteers kneeling in front of a sign saying stop the spread of aquatic invasive species

Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteers helped prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species over the Fourth of July holiday. / Photo Credit: Clean Boats, Clean Waters

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) celebrates Clean Boats, Clean Waters’ efforts to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species during the Fourth of the July, one of the busiest boating weekends of the summer.  

During the annual Landing Blitz, which took place July 1-5, watercraft inspectors across the state gathered at local boat landings to educate boaters on how to stop the spread of invasive species.

Invasive species are nonnative plants, animals and diseases that can cause great ecological, environmental or economic harm. Some have already been found in Wisconsin, while others pose a large risk of surviving and causing problems if they are introduced and become established here.

Inspectors and lake organizations noted a vast increase in boater activity on Wisconsin waters in 2020 with a continuing upward trend in 2021. Over the course of the five-day Landing Blitz, Clean Boats, Clean Waters inspectors and staff invested nearly 4,000 hours and spoke to over 24,000 people while inspecting 11,000 boats.

Annually, the DNR invests approximately $1 million into Clean Boats, Clean Waters grants and other Surface Water Grants that fund watercraft inspections and many other activities to protect our waters.

“It only takes a minute to remove plants, animals, mud or debris from boats, trailers and equipment and to drain all water from bilges, livewells and bait buckets,” said Erin McFarlane, the Statewide CBCW Educator with Extension Lakes. “These simple steps help keep invasive species from hitching a ride from one waterbody to another.”

Do your part to keep Wisconsin waters healthy and stop the spread of AIS by following these easy steps:

  • Inspect boats, trailers and equipment for attached aquatic plants or animals.
  • Remove all attached plants or animals and mud.
  • Drain all water from boats, motors, livewells and other equipment.
  • Never move live fish away from a waterbody.
  • Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.
  • Buy minnows from a licensed Wisconsin bait dealer.

Following these steps helps boaters comply with Wisconsin state law which prohibits the transport of aquatic invasive species. To learn more about invasive species and their impacts to Wisconsin’s waters and economy, visit the DNR’s Aquatic Invasive Species Efforts webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Waterfowl Hunters: Wear Your Life Jackets
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 16, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov

Waterfowl Hunters: Wear Your Life Jackets

Make Life Jackets #1 On Your Hunting Packing List

 

DNR warden in hunting boat wearing life jacket

The DNR is reminding all waterfowl hunters to wear a lifejacket while out on the water this season. / Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR

 MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is reminding waterfowl hunters to follow best safety practices as they hit the water this upcoming season.

Wisconsin has had 20 boating accident deaths so far this year, according to DNR records. More than 74,000 waterfowl hunters are expected on waterways this year, which begins with the youth hunt on Sept. 18.

It’s important for hunters to follow these safety tips to prevent boating accidents and deaths:

  • Be aware that water temperatures are rapidly cooling at this time of year. A fall overboard can turn dangerous quickly as hypothermia sets in. Wearing a life jacket can keep individuals on the surface and allow energy to be used to keep warm rather than to stay above the water.
  • Remember to protect canine companions on the water – they need life jackets, too.
  • Never overload the boat. If hunting on a large river or lake, use a boat that is big enough to handle rough water.
  • Balance the boat evenly and keep weight low for stability.
  • Be on the lookout for elements outside of your control, such as changing weather, or a slightly submerged stump, rock, sandbar or floating debris.
  • If in a boat or canoe with a hunting partner, establish and communicate a safe fire zone; do not stand to shoot if a partner is shooting from a seated position.
  • Always carry a cellphone so communication can happen in case of an emergency.

“Waterfowl hunters should keep in mind that hunting dogs can get excited and start jumping all over the boat, increasing the risk for capsizing. Hunting boats also tend to be smaller and less stable than average boats,” said Lt. Darren Kuhn, DNR Boating Safety Administrator. “This can be a recipe for trouble, so waterfowl hunters should always wear their life jackets.”

Hunters should also be aware of the danger of waders on the water. If a boat capsizes and the hunter is ejected, the waders would fill with water, creating suction around the hunter’s legs and feet making it difficult to remove the waders. This added water weight greatly increases the risk of drowning and wearing a life jacket can help keep hunters afloat.

One wearable life jacket is required for each person on board a boat and must fit properly. In addition to the wearable life jackets, a throwable personal flotation device, such as a ring buoy or standard seat cushion, is required for every boat longer than 16 feet.

For a complete guide to regulations and law changes, reference the 2021 Combined Wisconsin Hunting Regulations booklet.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Reveals Season Outlook For Fall Wild Turkey, Ruffed Grouse And Woodcock Seasons
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 16, 2021
Contact: Alaina Gerrits, DNR Marinette County Wildlife Biologist
Alaina.Gerrits@wisconsin.gov or 608-513-6739

Taylor Finger, DNR Migratory Game Bird Ecologist
Taylor.Finger@wisconsin.gov or 608-266-8841



DNR Reveals Season Outlook For Fall Wild
Turkey, Ruffed Grouse And Woodcock Seasons

 

Two wild turkeys strut in an open area with sparse trees during fall.

Ahead of the wild turkey, ruffed grouse and woodcock hunting season openers, the DNR shares season outlook and reminds hunters of online mapping tools. / Photo Credit: iStock/KGriff

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the season outlook for ruffed grouse, woodcock and wild turkey, plus essential updates for hunters to be in the know ahead of the Sept. 18 and Sept. 25 season openers.

The DNR provides hunters with free online mapping tools to identify habitat types and public land open to hunting upland game birds. The online Fields and Forest Lands Interactive Gamebird Hunting Tool provides upland gamebird hunters with an interactive way to locate cover suitable for ruffed grouse and woodcock, managed dove fields and properties stocked with game farm pheasants. On the go, hunters can use the DNR's free Hunt Wild Wisconsin mobile app.

Ruffed Grouse

The ruffed grouse season is open in Zone A Sept. 18 - Jan. 9, 2022. This earlier closure than previous years follows the DNR's 10-year ruffed grouse management plan. In Zone B, the season is open Oct. 16 - Dec. 8.

Statewide drumming survey results indicated a decrease of 6% in breeding grouse compared to 2019. Surveys were not completed in 2020 due to the ongoing COVID-19 public health emergency. In Wisconsin, the 10-year ruffed grouse population cycle typically peaks in years that end in 0, 9 or 1. This likely indicates we are entering the typical "down-phase" of the 10-year cycle.

To help track West Nile virus impacts in ruffed grouse, hunters are encouraged to participate in the final year of the DNR's West Nile virus sampling project this fall. As a reminder to hunters who requested a kit, they are now available for pickup at the service station you indicated on the survey.

Woodcock

Wisconsin's woodcock hunting season is open Sept. 25 - Nov. 8. Like waterfowl and mourning doves, woodcock are migratory game birds, so hunters who plan to pursue them must register annually with the Harvest Information Program (HIP).

A small game license is required to hunt woodcock and ruffed grouse. Small game licenses and HIP registration are available online through Go Wild or at any license agent.

Turkey

The fall turkey season opens statewide on Sept. 18. Closing dates for the fall turkey season vary by management zone. In zones 1-5, the season closes Jan. 9, 2022. In zones 6 and 7, the season closes Nov. 19. The use of dogs to hunt wild turkey is allowed statewide for the fall seasons.

Overall, Wisconsin's statewide wild turkey population remains strong. Following 30 years of sustained population growth and expansion across the state, wild turkeys are now found statewide. Wild turkey numbers appear to have stabilized at levels suitable to available habitat and will likely ebb and flow around those levels in response to weather, food availability and other natural factors.

Biologists closely monitor harvest during the either-sex fall turkey hunting season, as excessive hen harvest can affect turkey populations. Recent hen harvests in Wisconsin have been very low, and current hen harvest rates do not play a significant role in Wisconsin's turkey flock dynamics.

"Last winter was relatively mild with low snow levels statewide and few long-lasting cold snaps," said Alaina Gerrits, DNR Marinette County Wildlife Biologist. "Mild winter conditions paired with an early spring green-up and dry weather point to favorable brooding conditions for 2021. All field reports suggest a healthy and robust turkey population providing many opportunities for fall hunting."

Turkey hunters must have a fall turkey license, fall turkey harvest authorization and annual Wild Turkey Stamp. Each fall turkey license or conservation patron license now includes a fall turkey harvest authorization. Hunters must choose the zone for which their harvest authorization will be valid at the time of purchase. If more than one fall turkey harvest authorization is desired, hunters may purchase bonus turkey harvest authorizations in select zones while inventory remains. Licenses, stamps and bonus turkey harvest authorizations are available online at Go Wild or any license agent.

During gun deer season, turkey hunters are reminded that ground blinds on DNR lands are subject to highly visible color requirements. All unoccupied ground blinds must have the owner's name and address or DNR customer ID number near the door opening. Blinds and elevated devices can be left overnight Sept. 1 to Jan. 31 on DNR-managed properties north of Highway 64. Blinds and elevated devices south of Highway 64 on DNR-managed lands may not be left out overnight and must be removed daily at the close of shooting hours. Blinds used for waterfowl hunting or constructed entirely of vegetation do not have to be removed daily.

For more information on wild turkeys in Wisconsin, visit the DNR Turkey Hunting and Management webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Names Whitewater Resident Ginny Coburn State Natural Areas Steward Of The Year
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 16, 2021
Contact: Jared Urban, DNR State Natural Areas Volunteer Program Coordinator Jared.Urban@wisconsin.gov or 608-228-4349

DNR Names Whitewater Resident Ginny Coburn
State Natural Areas Steward Of The Year

 

Ginny Coburn, with light skin tone, gray hair, a red baseball cap and glasses, smiles holding up her Volunteer Steward of the Year award plaque.

The Wisconsin DNR has named Ginny Coburn the 2021 State Natural Areas Volunteer Steward of the Year for her work to help restore State Natural Areas in Kettle Moraine State Forest. / Photo Credit: Scott Farrell

WHITEWATER, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced Whitewater resident Ginny Coburn as the 2021 State Natural Areas Volunteer Steward of the Year for her work within the Southern Kettle Moraine State Forest.

Driven by a passion for nature and ecology, Coburn started volunteering at Kettle Moraine State Forest in 2012. Coburn and fellow volunteers have provided thousands of hours of labor at Bluff Creek, Kettle Moraine Oak Opening, Whitewater Oak Opening and Clover Valley Fen State Natural Areas in the Kettle Moraine State Forest, including removing brush, controlling invasive plants and collecting and sowing native prairie seeds. Coburn also serves as a contact for monthly workdays and greets and signs in volunteers.

"Ginny has had an important role in protecting and restoring some truly amazing prairies, springs, oak openings and fens in the Kettle Moraine," said Jared Urban, the DNR’s Volunteer Program Coordinator for State Natural Areas. "She was the first one to say yes to starting volunteer workdays to remove invasive plants in the Kettle Moraine and has been essential to keeping monthly workdays going." 

With nearly 10 years of volunteering at Kettle Moraine State Forest, Coburn possesses a wealth of knowledge, including safely wielding a chainsaw, collecting seeds and controlling invasive plants. Coburn is also instrumental in engaging others in this vital work, including her grandchildren who have volunteered alongside her on various projects.

Coburn’s deep community connections helped her recruit individuals and organizations for special projects, including a cooperative project to install a boot brush at Bluff Creek to prevent anglers from inadvertently spreading aquatic invasive species.

"Everyone likes Ginny," said Urban. "I most admire her energy to help make things happen. She is always ready to learn and is a let's-go-do-it kind of person.”

In addition to seeing great progress at State Natural Areas in Kettle Moraine State Forest, one of Coburn’s favorite parts of volunteering is the people she's met along the way.

"They are fun and knowledgeable and will come out and help or work in any weather," said Coburn. "We learn a lot from each other and have a very enjoyable time. We feel like we've done good work toward a really big goal."

Become A State Natural Area Volunteer

State Natural Areas are designated to conserve the best of Wisconsin prairies, forests, wetlands and other habitats. These unique places support 90% of rare plant species and 75% of rare wildlife species. Nearly all properties are open to the public to enjoy while bird watching, hiking, hunting and fishing.

The Wisconsin DNR is actively recruiting volunteers to help care for these unique places. No experience is necessary, and training and equipment are provided on-site.

To get involved and sign up for notifications of workdays, visit the DNR's State Natural Areas Volunteer Program webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of Kieler SD #1 Drinking Water Loan Program Project
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 17, 2021
Contact: Kevin Olson, DNR Community Financial Assistance Specialist
Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov  or 608-234-2238

DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of Kieler SD #1 Drinking Water Loan Program Project

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced that Kieler SD #1 is an applicant for funding through the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) to address deficiencies in its public drinking water system.

The project includes the replacement of existing 6 inch watermains, deficient and substandard mains and associated appurtenances along County Highway HHH and related work in the Kieler SD #1.

Activities related to this project are minor actions under Chapter NR 150, Wis. Admin. Code, for which no environmental analysis is required; however, following the SDWLP federal requirement 40 C.F.R. §35.3580, an environmental review must be conducted before funding this project.

The SDWLP has determined that the project will not result in significant adverse environmental effects, and no further environmental review or analysis is needed before proceeding with funding the project.

The public is encouraged to submit comments regarding this decision and the potential environmental impacts of this project. Submit comments by Oct. 1, 2021 to:

Department of Natural Resources
C/O Kevin Olson, Community Financial Assistance, CF/2
101 S Webster St.
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: 608-234-2238 or Email: Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov

Based on the comments received, the SDWLP may prepare an environmental analysis before proceeding with the funding process. The analysis would summarize the DNR’s consideration of the project's impacts and reasonable alternatives.

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