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Dick Ellis Blog:
6/30/2021
WHO SUPPORTS A WOLF GOAL OF 350 OR LESS IN WISCONSIN? Thirty-six Wisconsin County Boards have passed resolutions supporting a wolf goal of 350 (7) or 350 or less (26), 100 or less (1), 80 or less (1), or 50 or less (1).  The votes: Barron, Burnett, Vilas, Taylor, Florence, Forest, Iron, Jackson, Lincoln, Marinette, Oconto, Oneida, Price, Shawano, Waushara, Waupaca, Grant all passed unanimously, Adams, 16 for, 2 ag...
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Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Weekly Digest Bulletin

 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 7, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov



Help Pollinators By Collecting Wild Common Milkweed
Seedpods In Select Central Sands-Area Counties

A monarch butterfly drinks from a pink milkweed flower in front of a blurred green background.

The DNR seeks donations of mature milkweed seedpods from select Wisconsin counties to aid plantings on state prairies. / Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR

WISCONSIN RAPIDS, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is asking nature lovers and landowners in Wood, Portage, Adams, Juneau, Waushara and Marquette counties to collect wild common milkweed seedpods to help grow habitat for native pollinators on state lands.

Volunteers are encouraged to harvest seedpods from their property or neighbors’ fallow fields (with the property owner’s permission) from Sept. 10 through Sept. 30. The DNR will use collected seeds as part of a monarch habitat restoration project across several State Natural Areas in the Central Sands region.

“We aim to plant local native seeds, including milkweed, in established and new prairies to help pollinators like monarchs and the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly,” said Joshua Schultz, DNR Natural Heritage Conservation Program Intern and project lead. “We need the public’s help to collect milkweed seed to be planted in these state prairies for everyone to enjoy for generations to come.”

How To Help: Collect, Contain, Deliver

COLLECT – Harvest mature wild common milkweed seedpods only in Wood, Portage, Adams, Juneau, Waushara and Marquette counties. Mature pods are brownish-green or grayish-green. If the leaves are dying or falling off, the plant’s pods are likely ready for picking or soon will be.

CONTAIN – Place seed pods in a brown paper bag, feed sack, cloth bag or other breathable bags for donation. Include the following information on the seed bag: the address or latitude and longitude coordinates of where you collected the seed and contact information for any DNR follow-up questions.

DELIVER – Drop off the milkweed seed bags at one of three Chronic Wasting Disease sample collection sites available 24/7 in Adams, Necedah and Wisconsin Rapids, listed below. Place the seed bags in the side door of the kiosk to protect them from the elements. Once dropped off, contact project manager Joshua Schultz at schujc09@uwgb.edu or 608-403-6243 to let him know the seeds have been delivered.

Drop off sites: 

Why Milkweed Helps North American Pollinators

Wisconsin is in the heart of the breeding ground for the eastern migratory population of monarchs, whose population has decreased by 80% over the past 20 years. There are 54 of the state’s 72 counties located within the breeding area prioritized for monarch butterfly habitat. Recent research using data submitted over the past 25 years by volunteers with Journey North, a citizen-based monitoring project based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum, determined that Wisconsin had the fifth-highest number of monarchs just before the fall migration began to Mexico.

In addition to its importance for monarchs, Wisconsin is a stronghold for the federally endangered rusty patched bumble bee and the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. It is home to populations of 16 other at-risk pollinator species.  

Learn more about Wisconsin’s endangered species, including pollinators, and the work being done to protect them on the Wisconsin DNR’s Endangered Resources webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Protect Your Favorite Waterfowl Hunting Areas
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 7, 2021
Contact: Amy Kretlow, DNR Aquatic Invasive Species Monitoring Specialist Amy.Kretlow@Wisconsin.gov or 920-838-2597


Protect Your Favorite Waterfowl Hunting Areas

Take These Steps To Stop The Spread Of Invasive Species

 

man brushing his shoes off near a riverbank

Just a few minutes of preventative action can help preserve and protect hunting lands for generations to come. / Photo Credit: Wisconsin DNR

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is asking waterfowl hunters to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species this fall.

Invasive species are nonnative plants, animals and diseases that cause great ecological, environmental or economic harm. Some have already been found in Wisconsin, while others pose a large risk of surviving and causing problems if they are introduced and become established here.

Just a few minutes of preventative action can help preserve and protect hunting lands for generations to come. Before launching into and leaving a waterbody, waterfowl hunters should:

  • Inspect waders, boats, trailers, motors and hunting equipment, including boots, blinds and dogs
  • Remove all plants, animals and mud to the best of their ability
  • Drain all water from decoys, boats, motors, livewells and other hunting equipment
  • Remove all seed heads and roots when using vegetation for duck blinds
  • Never move plants or live animals, such as snails, away from a water body

In addition, the DNR and UW Madison Extension AIS Program often team up with the Wisconsin Waterfowl Association, Ducks Unlimited and other partners to place boot brush stations at access points near lake and river launches as well as some walk-in sites. If you are an organization interested in building and setting up your own boot brush stations, please contact DNRAISinfo@wisconsin.gov for more information.

Thank you to every hunter who follows the recommended prevention steps. Doing so before you leave the boat launch is keeping your favorite hunting spot safe and accessible for years to come.

For more information about aquatic invasive species, including where they are prohibited and restricted in Wisconsin, visit this DNR webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Deer Liver PFAS Surveillance Results Now Available
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 7, 2021
Contacts: Tami Ryan, DNR Wildlife Health Section Chief
Tamara.Ryan@wisconsin.gov or 414-750-8360;

Department of Health Services
DHSMedia@dhs.wisconsin.gov or 608-266-1683



Deer Liver PFAS Surveillance Results Now Available

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the results from a statewide monitoring effort evaluating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) levels in the liver of white-tailed deer are now available. After studying the results of this sampling effort, the DNR and the Department of Health Services (DHS) are not recommending a statewide consumption advisory for PFAS in white-tailed deer liver.

In September 2020, the DNR and DHS issued a Do Not Eat advisory for the liver from deer harvested within five miles of the JCI/Tyco Fire Technology Center in Marinette County, a site contaminated with PFAS. Due to the specific focus of the JCI/Tyco study, it was unclear whether the PFAS in liver tissue were the result of local exposure or whether they were representative of PFAS levels in the liver in deer statewide. To investigate background levels of PFAS in white-tailed deer throughout Wisconsin, the DNR analyzed additional liver samples from deer harvested during the 2020 November nine-day gun deer hunt.

A total of 32 liver samples collected from 32 different counties were submitted for analysis. Only one liver sample had detectable levels of PFAS. Perfluoro-n-octanesulfonic acid (PFOS), the PFAS compound for which consumption advisories are based, was not detected in any samples.

The purpose of the liver is to filter contaminants from the bloodstream. As such, it was not unexpected to detect trace levels of PFAS in some samples. Based on the results, the DNR and DHS have determined statewide restrictions on the consumption of white-tailed deer liver, outside of the existing advisory area within a 5-mile radius of the JCI/Tyco Fire Technology Center in Marinette, Wisconsin, are not warranted.

PFAS are a group of human-made chemicals used for decades in numerous products, including non-stick cookware, fast food wrappers, stain-resistant sprays and certain types of firefighting foam.

These contaminants have made their way into the environment through spills of PFAS-containing chemicals, discharges of PFAS-containing wastewater to treatment plants and certain types of firefighting foams.

For more information on safely consuming wild game, visit the DNR’s Safely Eating Wild Game webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Reminder: ‘Sowing The Seeds For Change’ Webinar Sept. 10
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 8, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov

Reminder: ‘Sowing The Seeds For Change’ Webinar Sept. 10

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is reminding the public that the first of three Safe Water For All educational webinars, Sowing Seeds for Change, will take place 12 – 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10

The webinar series is part of the Safe Water For All Campaign announced in July that is dedicated to educating the public on the leading drinking water contaminants, including PFAS, nitrates, lead and their impact on your health.   

Panelists for the webinar will discuss the role of the emerging carbon market on agriculture, what leading farmers and agricultural companies are doing and what that may mean for water quality.

Speakers include Tim Baye, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Business Development and State Energy Specialist; Dan Smith, President and CEO at the Cooperative Network, one of the nation’s largest trade associations; Sara Walling, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Division Administrator; and Mary C. Anderson, DNR Grazing and Conservation Agriculture Specialist.

Gov. Tony Evers declared 2019 the Year of Clean Drinking Water to address the fact that not all Wisconsinites have access to safe, clean drinking water. Gov. Evers directed the DNR and DHS, the agencies entrusted with protecting Wisconsin’s health and water resources, to strengthen water quality standards for nitrate, PFAS and lead. 

Learn more about how the State of Wisconsin is protecting our drinking water here.


Safe Water For All Panel Series

 

Sowing The Seeds For Change
12 p.m. Sept. 10 
Water gives us life and grows our food. Yet today too many who grow our food, can't drink their water. Listen to panelists discuss if carbon is the next cash crop and what could that mean for water quality. Learn how the agriculture carbon market is changing the supply chain, how America's farmers are helping reduce their carbon footprint and what it may mean for water quality.

Speakers:
Mary C. Anderson, Grazing and Conservation Agriculture Specialist, DNR
Tim Baye, Professor of Business Development and Farm Energy Specialist, Milwaukee Water Commons and UW-Extension
Dan Smith, President and CEO, Cooperative Network
Sara Walling, Division Administrator, Wisconsin Dept. of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection

Watch via the DNR’s YouTube channel here.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Fall Issue Of Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine Shines Spotlight On Hidden Gems
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 8, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov



Fall Issue Of Wisconsin Natural Resources
Magazine Shines Spotlight On Hidden Gems

 

A little girl paddles at the front of a kayak wearing a yellow life jacket.

Governor Knowles State Forest is among the Wisconsin State Park System’s many beautiful hidden gems. / Photo Credit: Robyn Singer

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced that the fall issue of Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine is now available in print and online

Within the pages, readers can learn about the unique places off the beaten path at state parks across Wisconsin. Striking photographs shared by Instagram users highlight the scenic beauty found within each hidden gem location.

Readers will also get to enjoy an up-close look at Peninsula State Park’s Eagle Tower following an extensive rebuilding project that includes a new accessible observation tower and treetop ramp that allows visitors of all abilities to take in the breathtaking views. Readers can dive deeper into the forest science behind the project that led to the stunning end result.

Celebrate Willow River State Park’s 50th anniversary by learning the history of how this beautiful property joined the State Park System in northwest Wisconsin.

Learn about a new DNR initiative designed to engage youth in urban areas in a favorite state pastime – fishing. The Mobile First Catch Center, dubbed the Fishmobile, brings angler education and equipment to places where kids might otherwise not have access.

The fall issue shines a spotlight on the work of the DNR’s conservation wardens, who make helping wildlife a priority. Other stories include information about a volunteer land access program that helps open more areas to public hunting; a retrospective marking the 150th anniversary of the 1871 Peshtigo fire; and a look at how the George W. Mead Wildlife Area adapted its visitor outreach during the COVID-19 public health emergency by developing virtual presentations and self-guided tours.

Plus, hear from DNR Secretary Preston D. Cole about the upcoming Safe Water for All panel series the agency is hosting this September and October. With safe, clean drinking water a vital priority, the panels will discuss leading contaminants that threaten water resources and address solutions to ensure clean water for all Wisconsinites.

Find all this and more in the fall print issue of Wisconsin Natural Resources and online at wnrmag.com. Grab four print issues for $8.97 by subscribing online or calling 1-800-678-9472.

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Announces 2022 Wild Turkey, Waterfowl And Pheasant Stamp Design Contest Winners
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 8, 2021
Contact: Taylor Finger, DNR Migratory Bird Specialist
Taylor.Finger@wisconsin.gov or 608-266-8841



DNR Announces 2022 Wild Turkey, Waterfowl And Pheasant Stamp Design Contest Winners

 

A painting of a pheasant in a field.

Winning artwork for the 2022 pheasant stamp design category by Mark Kanitz of Markesan. / Photo Credit: Mark Kanitz

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the winners of the 2022 Wisconsin Wild Turkey, Waterfowl and Pheasant stamp design contest.

Local Wisconsin artists compete annually for the opportunity to have their artwork featured on the Wisconsin Wild Turkey, Waterfowl and Pheasant stamps available for purchase through Go Wild and license agents.

A painting of a male turkey.

Sales of wild turkey, waterfowl and pheasant stamps enable hunters, conservationists and stamp collectors to support wildlife and habitat management, restoration and conservation around the state. Hunters are required to purchase stamps to harvest these game birds.

Robert Metropulous of Arbor Vitae won first place in this year's wild turkey stamp category with a painting featuring a tom turkey displaying for a hen decoy. Metropulous, a past winner of the waterfowl and pheasant stamp design contest categories, has painted for decades having first learned his lifelong passion from his mother.

A painting of a duck.

Mark Kanitz of Markesan took first place in the pheasant design category having credited the many years of hunting and outdoor recreation as inspiration for his submission, which depicts a rooster and hen pheasant in front of a snowy farm scene.

Brian Kuether of Greenfield won the waterfowl design category with a lifelike painting of a northern shoveler at rest in the water. Kuether studied this bird rarely seen in Wisconsin by spending many hours at Horicon Marsh and the Green Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Robert Leum of Holmen won second place in the turkey design category and third place in both the pheasant and waterfowl categories. Robert Andrea of Spooner won second place in the pheasant design category and Jon Rickaby of Suamico won second place in the waterfowl design category. Robert Wilkins of Kiel won third place in the wild turkey design category.

This year a total of 34 pieces were submitted for judging on Aug. 28 at the Wisconsin Waterfowl Expo in Oshkosh. This year's judges were Bruce Urban from the Wisconsin Waterfowl Association, John Motoviloff from National Wild Turkey Federation and Cody Kamrowski from Pheasants Forever.

An electronic "stamp approval" is printed on the licenses of wild turkey, pheasant and waterfowl hunters at the time of purchase. Customers will not receive an actual stamp except upon request. To obtain a physical copy of a stamp, visit the DNR's wildlife and fish collector stamps webpage or go to any open DNR Service Center.

For more information about Wisconsin wildlife stamps, visit the DNR Wildlife Stamps webpage.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Public Invited To Attend Preview Of Woodland Dunes, Henry Wetland Restoration Project In Manitowoc
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 9, 2021
Contact: Mary Flanderka, DNR Project Manager, Wisconsin Wetland Conservation Trust
mary.flanderka@wisconsin.gov or 920-838-5315
Jim Knickelbine, Woodland Dunes Executive Director
920-793-4007

Public Invited To Attend Preview Of Woodland Dunes, Henry Wetland Restoration Project In Manitowoc

Approximately 80 Acres Of Wetlands Restored

 

An image of a field.

The DNR and Woodland Dunes Nature Center and Preserve invite the public to attend a preview of the Woodland Dunes and Henry Wetland Restoration Project in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, Sept. 11, 2021. / Photo Credit: Jon Gumtow, Stantec

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Woodland Dunes Nature Center and Preserve welcome the public to attend a preview of the Woodland Dunes and Henry Wetland Restoration Project in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, located south of U.S. Highway 310 on Woodland Drive.

The project is restoring about 80 acres of wetlands to near pre-settlement conditions as part of a DNR grant program. The sneak peek will take place on Sept. 11, 2021, between 9 and 11 a.m. Experts will be on-site to explain the importance of this restoration project and share their knowledge of some of the new species of plants and birds present.

The Wisconsin Wetland Conservation Trust (WWCT) funded the restoration of the former agricultural field to its completion. The WWCT is a wetland mitigation program administered by the DNR. The WWCT funds wetland restoration projects to offset permitted wetland impacts resulting from development.

“The WWCT is a great example of private entities and the DNR working together,” said Josh Brown, DNR Wetland In-Lieu Fee Program Coordinator. “It’s a ‘win-win-win’ for developers, the environment and municipalities because development projects can be implemented while still protecting watersheds.”

Public and private partnerships were critical to transforming this former farm field, once proposed for industrial development, into a mosaic of diverse habitat types, including native grassland, shrub and forested swamp.

Site planning began in 2017, and restoration activities began in the fall of 2019. This project also requires a conservation easement on the 80-acre area to remain a protected wetland in perpetuity. The Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin will fund long-term management through an endowment.

Nearly 3.5 miles of drain tiles were broken, shallow wetland pools were excavated and the site was planted with native grasses, wildflowers, trees and shrubs. This area is now home to over 65 different bird species. It provides both nesting and stopover habitat for netropical songbirds, raptors, shorebirds and waterfowl and pollinator habitat for insects.

The restoration is located directly across from other Woodland Dunes property. Expanding on existing protected natural areas will further improve the health and resiliency of the Manitowoc River watershed. The site will be open to the public for nature-based outdoor activities such as hiking and birdwatching.

Woodland Dunes Nature Center and Preserve. is a 501(c)3 non-profit that restores, protects and sustains Woodland Dunes habitat by building partnerships to advance projects that benefit Manitowoc County watersheds.

For more information,  contact Jim Knickelbine, Woodland Dunes Executive Director, at 920-93-4007 or Mary Flanderka, Wisconsin Wetland Conservation Trust, at mary.flanderka@wisconsin.gov or 920-838-5315.

Visit the DNR webpage here to learn more about wetlands and restoration projects.

 
NEWS RELEASE: Archery And Crossbow Deer Hunting Seasons Open Sept. 18
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 9, 2021
Contact: Jeff Pritzl, DNR Deer Biologist
Jeffrey.Pritzl@wisconsin.gov or 920-366-3450
Ashley Van Egtern, DNR Assistant Administrator Of Hunter Education Ashley.VanEgtern@wisconsin.gov or 608-513-9625

Archery And Crossbow Deer Hunting Seasons Open Sept. 18

Hunt Smart Hunt Safe This Deer Season

 

An image of a female hunter using a crossbow.

Archery and crossbow deer-hunting seasons open Sept. 18. / Photo Credit: iStock / DLCcreates

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is reminding hunters of their first opportunity to pursue deer this fall with the opening of the 2021 archery and crossbow deer seasons. These seasons run concurrently statewide from Sept. 18 to Jan. 9, 2022. The archery and crossbow seasons extend to Jan. 31, 2022, in 27 Farmland Zone Deer Management Units and all metro sub-units.

"We saw another mild winter last year, so Wisconsin deer hunters can look forward to increased harvest opportunities this season,” said Jeff Pritzl, DNR Deer Program Specialist. “Whether you’re hunting public or private land, I encourage hunters to get out and become familiar with seasonal food sources as this will influence deer movement in their local area.”

In 2020, archery and crossbow hunters harvested more than 110,000 deer, including more than 64,000 bucks, an increase from 2019.

Those interested in hunting with both a vertical bow and crossbow may do so by paying full price for one license and purchasing a $3 upgrade for the second license. Only one bow buck harvest authorization will be issued to hunters who purchase both licenses.

Hunter Safety And TAB-K

The DNR urges hunters to review these four rules of safety (TAB-K) before enjoying the archery and crossbow season.

  • Treat every bow/crossbow as if it were loaded.
  • Always point the bow/crossbow in a safe direction.
  • Be certain of your target; what is before and beyond it.
  • Keep your finger outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot.

Archery-Specific Safety Tips

When heading out to hunt during the archery or crossbow seasons, remember these additional safety tips:

  • Crossbows have a safety. Immediately after cocking, always check to make sure that your bow is on safe.
  • Always use bolts/arrows recommended by the manufacturer and handle carefully.
  • Protect yourself and the arrow points with a covered arrow quiver.
  • The safest way to carry, transport and raise or lower a crossbow from a stand is always to have the crossbow un-cocked.
  • The safest way to un-cock a crossbow is to fire a bolt into the ground or target.
  • Make sure that the limb tips are free of obstructions and your fingers, hand or arm are not in the string path at any time while the crossbow is cocked.
  • Know your range for accuracy.

Tree stand safety is also a key consideration through all the deer hunting seasons. Tree stand incidents are a leading cause of injury to hunters. Always wear a safety harness, use three points of contact when going into or out of the stand and use a haul line to bring the unloaded bow or crossbow into the stand. Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. For more information regarding tree stand safety, visit the DNR webpage here.

Bonus Authorizations Still Available

Bonus antlerless harvest authorizations remain available in many counties. Bonus antlerless harvest authorizations may be filled using any weapon type during the appropriate season with the appropriate license but must be filled in the designated zone, unit and land type (public or private). Bonus antlerless harvest authorizations are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the cost of $12 each for residents, $20 each for non-residents and $5 for youth hunters under age 12.

In 2021, a Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless harvest authorization is included with each deer hunting license purchase in units that offer them. Some units will offer more than one antlerless deer harvest authorization with each deer license.

Hunters who have not yet purchased a deer hunting license will be prompted to select the county and land type for the Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless harvest authorizations at the time of purchase. Purchase a license online at GoWild.WI.Gov or at license sales locations.

Hunters who purchased their deer hunting licenses before June 1 may now select their Farmland (Zone 2) harvest authorizations. Hunters who have yet to determine a hunting location may defer the Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless harvest authorization selection. When ready, hunters may make a harvest authorization selection online from their Go Wild account to print themselves or visit an authorized license sales location to print, requiring a $2 processing fee.

GameReg

As a reminder, all harvested deer must be registered electronically by 5 p.m. the day after the deer is recovered. GameReg is simple, fast and convenient for hunters. As conservationists, hunters understand the importance of harvest registration and what it means to deer management in Wisconsin. The system will prompt hunters to answer a series of questions, beginning with the unique harvest authorization number and their date of birth.

Hunters have three options to register their deer:

  • Online at GameReg.WI.Gov (fastest and easiest option);
  • By phone at 1-844-426-3734 (1-844-GAME-REG); or
  • Electronically at a participating in-person registration station (keyword "registration stations").

More information regarding electronic registration is available by visiting the DNR webpage here.  

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of Village of Dorchester Safe Drinking Water Loan Program Project
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 10, 2021
Contact: Kevin Olson, DNR Community Financial Assistance Specialist
Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov  or 608-234-2238

DNR Seeking Public Comment For Environmental Review Of Village of Dorchester Safe Drinking Water Loan Program Project

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced the Village of Dorchester is an applicant for funding through the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) to address deficiencies in its public drinking water system.

The project includes the replacement of watermains in the area of Front Street between West Center Avenue, Kennedy Avenue, and S. Third Street between W. Second Avenue and West Center Avenue (County Highway A), in the Village of Dorchester.

Activities related to this project are minor actions under Chapter NR 150, Wis. Admin. Code, for which no environmental analysis is required; however, following the SDWLP federal requirement 40 C.F.R. §35.3580, an environmental review must be conducted before funding this project.

The SDWLP has determined that the project will not result in significant adverse environmental effects, and no further environmental review or analysis is needed before proceeding with funding the project.

The public is encouraged to submit comments regarding this decision and the potential environmental impacts of this project. Submit comments by Sept. 24, 2021 to:

Department of Natural Resources
C/O Kevin Olson, Community Financial Assistance, CF/2
101 S Webster St.
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: 608-234-2238 or Email: Kevin.Olson@wisconsin.gov

Based on the comments received, the SDWLP may prepare an environmental analysis before proceeding with the funding process. The analysis would summarize the DNR’s consideration of the project's impacts and reasonable alternatives.

 

 
NEWS RELEASE: DNR To Host ‘Threats On Tap: Marginalized Communities’ Webinar Sept. 15
 
DNR News Release Header Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 10, 2021
Contact: DNR Office of Communications
DNRPress@wisconsin.gov


DNR To Host ‘Threats On Tap: Marginalized Communities’ Webinar Sept. 15

Second Webinar In Series Of Panel Discussions About Safe Water For All

 

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will host the second of three educational webinars, Threats on Tap: Marginalized Communities, from 11 a.m.–12 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 15. 

The webinar series is part of the Safe Water For All Campaign announced in July that is dedicated to educating the public on the leading drinking water contaminants, including PFAS, nitrates, lead and their impact on your health.   

While the Safe Drinking Water Act guarantees all Wisconsinites access to clean, drinkable water, not everyone can safely turn on the tap. The United States has remarkable water systems, developed over two centuries of technological, institutional and economic advances. However, the benefits of those systems have not been equally felt across the state.

Panelists will discuss environmental justice and water safety issues facing marginalized areas – communities of color, low-income communities and rural communities. Panelists will also share ideas for actions government agencies and the public can take to help ensure safe and affordable drinking water for all.

Speakers include Regina Strong, environmental justice public advocate in Michigan’s Office of Environmental Justice, Brenda Coley, co-executive director of Milwaukee Water Commons, a nonprofit organization, and Margaret Ann Noodin, director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. Maria Redmond, director of the Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy in the Wisconsin Department of Administration, will moderate the session.

Gov. Tony Evers declared 2019 the Year of Clean Drinking Water to address the fact that not all Wisconsinites have access to safe, clean drinking water. Gov. Evers directed the DNR and DHS, the agencies entrusted with protecting Wisconsin’s health and water resources, to strengthen water quality standards for nitrate, PFAS and lead. 


Safe Water For All Panel Series

 

Threats On Tap - Marginalized Communities At Risk
11 a.m. Sept. 15
While the Safe Drinking Water Act guarantees all Wisconsinites access to clean, drinkable water, not everyone can safely turn on the tap. The United States has remarkable water systems, developed over two centuries of technological, institutional and economic advances. However, the benefits of those systems have not been equally felt across the state. Water systems that serve marginalized areas – communities of color, low-income communities and rural communities – are more likely to be unsafe. Hear about the efforts to understand and to secure safe and affordable drinking water for every community.

Speakers:
Brenda Coley, Co-Executive Director, Milwaukee Water Commons
Margaret Ann Noodin, Director, Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education, UW-Milwaukee
Maria Redmond, Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy Director, Wisconsin Department of Administration
Regina Strong, Environmental Justice Public Advocate, Michigan Office of Environmental Justice, Michigan's Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy

Watch via the DNR’s YouTube channel here.

 

Protecting The People - Safe Water For All
12 p.m. Oct. 12
Wisconsin has a long history of protecting the state's waters and even led the nation in drinking water protection with the passage of the 1983 groundwater law. Approximately two-thirds of people living in Wisconsin get their drinking water from groundwater. Adequate supplies of uncontaminated groundwater are crucial not only for our health but also for our breweries, agricultural operations and cutting-edge industries in Wisconsin. Hear how Wisconsin is working to protect your health and what you can do to get involved.

Speakers:
Jennifer Hauxwell, Associate Director, UW-Madison Aquatic Sciences Center
Jon Meiman, Chief Medical Officer and State Occupational and Environmental Disease Epidemiologist, Wisconsin Dept. of Health Services
Bruce Rheineck, DNR Groundwater Section Chief

 
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