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Dick Ellis Blog:
9/5/2019
Mourning Doves serve as door to new seasons Micah and I will walk again into a new hunting season this afternoon like we’ve walked together into eight Septembers before. Mourning doves are calling us now, more as a way to shake the dust off and welcome a new autumn than anything else. Later it will be more “serious” pursuits of pheasant and duck. Almost certainly, my brother John and his lab Dylan will join us again today as th...
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DNR Southeast Wisconsin news release: Monitoring efforts identify additional starry stonewort locations

http://dnr.wi.gov/news/releases/article/?id=3647  

MILWAUKEE -- Coordinated efforts to monitor waterways around Little Muskego Lake have confirmed the presence of the aquatic invasive species starry stonewort in Big Muskego Lake and Bass Bay in addition to locations in Little Muskego Lake.

The additional findings come as the plant becomes easier to detect during its summer growth phase, said Bob Wakeman, aquatic invasive species coordinator with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. As part of its surveillance work, DNR also has collected plant material from nearby Long Lake and submitted it for DNA testing. 

Diver assisted suction harvesting and hand pulling is now underway in Little Muskego Lake and plans to address the Big Muskego Lake findings will be discussed with local partners, Wakeman said.

Starry stonewort, a Eurasian invader first discovered in the U.S. in the St. Lawrence River in 1978, can form dense lakebed mats that crowd out native plants and eliminate habitat for juvenile fish. Chemical treatment of starry stonewort has not been effective in other states as it has been found to temporarily reduce the height of the plants while leaving the star-shaped bulbils intact in the lake bed. Damaged plants quickly regrow.

“We appreciate the work of our partners in conducting additional monitoring and we are encouraging the affected communities and groups to apply for aquatic invasive species rapid response grants,” Wakeman said. “These grants can be used to establish additional Clean Boats Clean Waters checkpoints at launches to ensure boats are properly cleaned and drained before leaving the lakes.”

Boaters are likely the primary mechanism moving the plant among the water bodies and the community is encouraging boaters to observe the necessary precautions, said Tom Zagar, conservation coordinator for the city of Muskego.

“Boaters need to do their part to prevent the spread of this and other aquatic invaders by inspecting boats, trailers and equipment; removing any attached aquatic plants or animals before transporting; and draining all water from boats, motors and equipment,” Zagar said. “We want to thank our community members and stakeholders for taking an active role in monitoring, removal and boater education efforts as we try to combat this unwanted addition to our lakes.”

To learn more about starry stonewort, visit dnr.wi.gov, and search for "regulated invasive algae."

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