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Dick Ellis Blog:
3/8/2021
DICK ELLIS Are state population numbers far understated? Wisconsin hunters took just three days to harvest 216 wolves during the February hunt, reinforcing the belief of thousands of Wisconsin sportsmen that the official stated population of 1195 wolves is significantly below the actual count. The harvest of 216 wolves is 8 percent over the harvest quota of 200 wolves unanimously voted for by the Natural Resources Board on February 15. Headi...
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Lucky applicants to begin the wolf hunt October 15

EDITOR'S ADVISORY: This news release has been updated to indicate that people who applied for a wolf license can check on their application status through the DNR Online Licensing Center. The list of successful applicants is not available on the DNR website.

MADISON – Successful applicants for Wisconsin’s 2012 inaugural wolf hunting and trapping license could receive their winner notification as early as today.

Successful applicants for Wisconsin’s 2012 inaugural wolf hunting and trapping license could receive their winner notification as early as Friday, Sept. 14. The successful 1,160 applicants were selected through a random drawing from the 20,272 people who had applied for licenses. Applicants can check to see if they were successful through the Department of Natural Resources Online Licensing Center and materials were also mailed to successful applicants Sept. 13.

License authorizations were awarded to 1,145 Wisconsin applicants and 15 out-of-state applicants; 486 hunters and trappers from out of state had applied. Most out of state winners were from Illinois (5) and Minnesota (3.)

License authorizations were awarded through a random computer selection. Hunters who were unsuccessful this year have been awarded a preference point for future drawings.

“Wisconsin’s wolf hunting and trapping season begins Oct. 15, the first such hunt in modern state history. We wish the lucky applicants a safe and rewarding season,” said Secretary Cathy Stepp. "This management hunt was made possible by a lot of hard work and dedication of staff, volunteers and partners. The wolf, once extirpated from the state, has recovered and is now being responsibly managed under state authority."

License authorizations were issued to residents of 71 Wisconsin counties and were roughly evenly spread across age groups. Of the total, 91 went to women and 1,069 to men.

Successful applicants may purchase their wolf harvest license at any license sales location or online at dnr.wi.gov now or during the season. The cost is $100 for residents, and $500 for nonresidents. Successful applicants have the option of transferring their wolf harvest license to a youth or an adult who meets the eligibility requirements within 15 days of notification that they were successful in the drawing.

A wolf license authorizes both hunting and trapping. The license holder must meet the appropriate education requirements for trapping or hunting or must be participating in the Hunting Mentorship program. Successful hunters are required to tag and register their wolf. Regulations were sent to the successful applicants and are also available on DNR’s website at dnr.wi.gov, keyword search "wolf."

Ruling temporarily prevents hunting wolves with dogs, and training dogs to hunt wolves

Successful applicants are being advised that a recent judicial ruling has temporarily prevented or enjoined the use of dogs for hunting wolves, and also the use of dogs to train to hunt wolves. As a result of this ruling, the use of dogs for tracking and trailing of wolves is not authorized when hunting wolves under a wolf harvesting license. Also, the use of dogs for training to track or trail free ranging wolves is not authorized at this time. As this is a temporary injunction, it could be lifted at a future date. DNR will issue more information as it becomes available.

Harvest zone closure and quota information

Hunters are also being advised that with a new season structure, it is possible success rates may be higher than predicted and harvest quotas could be reached prior to the end of the season in some harvest zones. The wolf hunting and trapping season runs from October 15, 2012, to February 28, 2013. However, if harvest levels reach the quota for a zone, the department will enact an emergency closure in that zone. If a zone is closed, it would not take effect until at least 24 hours after the department announces the closure. Closures will be announced using the following methods:

  •   Announcement on DNR’s website at dnr.wi.gov;
  •   Recorded phone-in wolf information system;
  •   Email to anyone who subscribes to the Wolf Harvest email notification system, and
  •   Press release announcing the zone closure.

Gray wolves are protected by the Convention on the International Trade of Threatened and Endangered Species, and as a result are required to have the proper tags to leave the state or country.

Anyone seeking addition information about the hunt, or anyone who would like to receive email updates about harvest and zone information, should call the DNR Call Center at 1-888-936-7463. The Call Center is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week.

CONTACTS: Kurt Thiede, 608 266-5833; Bill Cosh, 608 267-2773