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Dick Ellis Blog:
3/8/2019
With Spring Turkey season just around the corner, Henry USA sent us a video now posted on our homepage that I know you’ll get a kick out of. The point is though, young hunters and smaller hunters won’t get a kick out of it at all. The wait for a gobbler can be too long to question whether or not you’re packing the right turkey load when he does show up (Dick Ellis Photo) Henry wanted to test the viability of their beautiful ...
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Rent Exclusive Daily Access to Private Hunting Land: A new option for hunters and landowners in Wisconsin.

Rentahunt is a new and innovative concept that enables landowners to easily rent daily access to their land. Rentahunt enables landowners to realize an unforeseen income stream, while simultaneously giving hunters a convenient and affordable option to have exclusive access to private hunting land. 

Wisconsin has a longstanding tradition of hunting, but as time moves on and the market changes, quality hunting land is becoming harder and harder to find and hunting license sales are steadily declining.

There’s something to be said about hunting in the peace and quiet of the outdoors – some say it’s spiritual – but whatever “it” is, is what hunting is all about. That’s exactly what attracted three local Wisconsin hunters to the sport – Matt Jahnke, Tom Jahnke, and Aaron Jermier. One morning, while hunting shoulder-to-shoulder with fellow duck hunters, they realized that the same public wetlands they’d been hunting for years had changed. It had grown increasingly crowded. Single flocks of ducks were being courted by numerous decoy setups and duck callers, and hunting had become more about beating the “competition” out to the best spot before sunrise, having the most decoys, or out-calling your neighbors. The “it” that had attracted them to hunting was fading. Finding quality hunting land was a challenge, so they brainstormed and came up with a solution while sitting in their duck blind.

That’s when the idea for rentahunt.com came to fruition. Having grown up in a rural town, they also realized that many of the surrounding farms had land that sat idle much of the year – meaning untapped potential income for those landowners willing to share their land. Rentahunt was an obvious win-win for hunters and landowners.

Prior to rentahunt, the only options for a hunter to access hunting land was by knocking on doors, committing to long-term leases, hunting public land, or purchasing hunting land. All those methods seemed either inefficient or too expensive for the average hunter. They knew there had to be a better way to connect hunters and landowners. A little over a year ago, they put their idea into action and created a secure online marketplace that would allow landowners to rent their land to hunters on a daily basis.

For hunters, rentahunt is much more convenient and financially feasible than committing to a long-term lease or buying land. Quality hunting land is becoming harder and harder for the average hunter to find due to high land costs, expensive long-term leases, and overcrowded public lands. On the other hand, many landowners often do not hunt every season, or simply do not hunt at all. Due to a combination of low crop prices and high overhead costs, farmers and landowners are starting to look for additional ways to produce income with their land.