Submit your Email to receive the On Wisconsin Outdoors Newsletter.

Our Sponsors:

Cap Connection

Golden Eagle Log Homes

RJ Millwork Inc.

Daves Turf and Marine

Wounded Warriors In Action

Kwik Trip

Dick Ellis Blog:
6/30/2021
WHO SUPPORTS A WOLF GOAL OF 350 OR LESS IN WISCONSIN? Thirty-six Wisconsin County Boards have passed resolutions supporting a wolf goal of 350 (7) or 350 or less (26), 100 or less (1), 80 or less (1), or 50 or less (1).  The votes: Barron, Burnett, Vilas, Taylor, Florence, Forest, Iron, Jackson, Lincoln, Marinette, Oconto, Oneida, Price, Shawano, Waushara, Waupaca, Grant all passed unanimously, Adams, 16 for, 2 ag...
...Read More or Post a Comment Click Here to view all Ellis Blogs

OWO

Waukesha Truck Accessory store and service, truck bed covers, hitches, latter racks, truck caps

Kwik Trip

OWO

Kwik Trip

OWO

OWO

OWO and Kwik Trip

OWO and Kwik Trip

OWO

OWO and Kwik Trip

OWO

/Content/files/Sponsors/Summer.jpg

OWO

OWO

Kwik Trip

Kwik Trip

Kwik Trip

/Content/files/Sponsors/BuckysBanner-nov-dec2012.png

Bob's Bear Bait

OWO and Kwik Trip

Kwik Trip

OWO and Kwik Trip

Kwik Trip

OWO

/Content/files/Sponsors/AdvertiseBrown.png

OWO

OWO

DNR Weekly News Update for October 24, 2017

Weekly NewsPublished - October 24, 2017 by the Central Office

 

 

New podcast and web series, Wild Wisconsin, gives hunters ability to learn on the go this fall

[EDITOR'S ADVISORY: This news release was previously issued to statewide media.]

MADISON -- Scouting, buying your license, sighting in your rifle - the basics. But, how can you take your hunt to the next level?

Easy access to information is the key to a successful hunt, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is excited to announce the launch of a new podcast and web series - Wild Wisconsin.

The future of deer hunting is here, with Wild Wisconsin.
The future of deer hunting is here, with Wild Wisconsin.
Photo Credit: DNR

Easy access to information is the key to a successful hunt, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is excited to announce the launch of a new podcast and web series - Wild Wisconsin.

Whether you prefer to watch all segments at once, catch one or two on the move, or listen to podcasts during your commute, Wild Wisconsin has it all. Topics range from public land hunting strategies to CWD and what it means for Wisconsin's deer herd.

Sponsors for Wild Wisconsin include Legendary Whitetails, Vortex Optics, and Mayville Engineering Company. Together, we are working to change how we communicate with hunters.

Wild Wisconsin episodes - watch when you want, where you want:

Check out these "Off the Record" podcasts:

All segments and podcasts, along with wild game recipes and much more, can be found at dnr.wi.gov, keywords "Wild Wisconsin."

Be sure to follow DNR's FacebookInstagramYouTube and Twitter pages for more Wild Wisconsin as we get closer to the gun deer opener.

________________________

 

Warm temperatures deliver anglers two walleye bites: shallow and deep

MADISON -- Fall walleye fishing is typically some of the most productive for ole marble eyes, and this year, anglers are getting a bonus bite thanks to a warm fall thus far, state fish biologists say.

"There are two bites going on right now," says Steve Gilbert, Department of Natural Resources fisheries supervisor in Woodruff. "Good walleye fishing can be found in both shallow and deep transitional areas."

Fall is a good time to fish for walleye, as Alex Bentz shows with 30-inch walleye caught last week on the Wisconsin River.
Fall is a good time to fish for walleye, as Alex Bentz shows with 30-inch walleye caught last week on the Wisconsin River.
Photo Credit: DNR

Fish are in shallow water hanging out by the last green weeds, feeding on little perch and bluegill, he says. "Many of the shallower lakes have turned over and the lager deep lakes are close. This will start to get walleye going to deeper water over harder bottoms.

"Our creel surveys show lakes get a bump in walleye fishing success in October. With the warm weather this fall the bite should continue into early November."

Gilbert's own fishing was good over the weekend and advises anglers to find a walleye lake with a good population, use a quarter-ounce jig and minnow on the bottom or use stick type crank baits in perch patterns for the shallow water bite. Be ready to move and switch up baits and tactics.

"Once you locate fish on a spot they will be schooled up this time of year. "With walleye fishing, it can change in a minute."

Zach Lawson, a DNR fisheries biologist stationed in Mercer, says anglers "are taking advantage of prime time for trophy specimens, with walleyes in the upper 20-inch range being reported."

"The prolonged warm weather in much of Wisconsin delayed the turnover process on many lakes through mid-October, keeping gamefish tight to vegetation and setting up an awesome shallow water bite for walleyes in many of the lakes in our area," he says.

While many anglers were wondering when the transition to the deep water fishing was going to happen, recent weather patterns have now "flipped" many lakes, creating conditions where anglers may want to turn attention to deeper rock structure, hard bottom areas, and steep breaking shorelines, especially in lakes with a cisco forage base, Lawson says.

In southern Wisconsin, anglers are catching some nice walleye in shallow water, reports David Rowe, fisheries supervisor in Fitchburg.

"It's a good time of the year for big fish. Walleye and musky are putting on the feedbag," he says. "Recently one of our technicians caught a 30-inch walleye on Lake Wisconsin"

This time of fall shore anglers can have as good a chance as boat anglers at catching large fish; Rowe recommends fishing shallow water where rivers enter lakes with a slip bobber and a large minnow fished near the bottom. Trolling crankbaits on the outside edge of the weed lines can also be productive for those larger trophies in fall.

Wisconsin represents the heart of the national distribution of walleye; they are found naturally in larger lakes and rivers and excellent walleye angling opportunities exist in the Mississippi River; the Wisconsin River and its impoundments; Lake Winnebago; the Wolf and Fox River systems; and larger lakes all over Wisconsin, especially in northern Wisconsin.

Anglers looking for new waters to fish for walleye can consult DNR's "quality walleye fishing waters list" or the walleye forecast in the 2017 Wisconsin Fishing Report.

Fall electrofishing underway

While anglers are busy fishing this fall, state fisheries crews are busy "electrofishing," using specialized boats to conduct night-time surveys statewide to assess how well young walleye hatched earlier this year have survived until fall.

Fall electrofishing efforts in Iron and Ashland County consistently documented a walleye year class (hatched this spring, currently 4 to 8 inches), but also turned up impressive numbers of yearlings in our naturally reproducing waters.
Fall electrofishing efforts in Iron and Ashland County consistently documented a walleye year class (hatched this spring, currently 4 to 8 inches), but also turned up impressive numbers of yearlings in our naturally reproducing waters.
Photo Credit: DNR

Watch these videos taken last week on Lake Mendota in Dane County to see how fisheries staff use boom shocking boats to deliver an electric current to water that briefly stun the fish so they can be netted and measured. Biologists use information from the fall electrofishing to estimate the amount of recruitment or how many young fish are coming into a population. (all links exit to DNR YouTube Channel)

Why Electrofishing? https://youtu.be/VTEqenSTCkI

Live from the boat: https://youtu.be/dxTNykGp7ok

Data Recording: https://youtu.be/ODnM9DhQX7Q

Lawson says that electrofishing in Iron and Ashland county consistently documented a walleye-year class but also turned up impressive numbers of yearlings in our natural reproduction systems.

"These fish are not quite up to a harvestable size, but anglers are catching good numbers of them now, and this bodes very well for the future of these fisheries," Lawson says.

________________________

 

Draft property master plan for the Totogatic Wildlife Area topic of upcoming open house meeting

HAYWARD, Wis. - The public will have an opportunity at an upcoming town hall meeting to review and comment on a draft master plan for the Totogatic River Wildlife Area.

This meeting will be informal, with informational materials and maps available for viewing. The Totogatic Rover Wildlife Area master plan outlines authorized resource management and facility development options and will act as a blueprint for consistent, long term management of the area. The town hall meeting will be held from 4-7 p.m. Nov. 6 at Hayward High School commons area, 10320 N. Greenwood Lane, Hayward. Department of Natural Resources staff will be in attendance to discuss components of the proposed property management plan.

Existing boat launch upstream of the Wozny Road dam.
Existing boat launch upstream of the Wozny Road dam. 
Photo Credit: DNR

Acquisition of the Totogatic Wildlife Area began in 1941 and was completed in 1951, comprising a total of 2,719 acres. This project was funded originally through the Pittman-Robertson Act as a waterfowl restoration area. A 600-foot dike and 70-foot dam were completed in 1953 that flooded approximately 1,000 acres with about 400 acres of open water. Boat landings were built on and near the property to provide public access. Active timber management provides a diverse forest with a focus on quality wildlife habitat. The property is used for canoeing, wildlife viewing, fishing and waterfowl hunting, among other activities.

The draft master plan includes the recommendation to eventually remove the Wozny Road dam primarily due to state funds not being available to replace or repair the structure.

For more information regarding the property and the draft master plan, visit dnr.wi.gov, search keywords "master planning" and select "Totogatic Wildlife Area Master Plan."

 

A public comment period on the draft plan will run through Nov. 21, 2017.

________________________

 

Online tools show hunters where baiting and feeding is banned

MADISON - Before taking part in upcoming hunting seasons or placing feed for wildlife, hunters and wildlife enthusiasts should be sure to check the baiting and feeding page of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources website for which counties currently prohibit wildlife baiting and feeding activities.

The following 15 counties previously subject to deer baiting and feeding prohibitions have reverted back to regulated deer baiting and feeding: Barron, Burnett, Calumet, Clark, Dodge, Jackson, Kenosha, Manitowoc, Milwaukee, Polk, Racine, Sheboygan, Washburn, Washington and Waushara. It is important to note that baiting and feeding restrictions remain in place for 28 chronic wasting disease affected areas/counties, none of which will be lifted in 2017.

This change affects counties in which an individual is restricted on the placement of bait/feed. The current regulations for placement of bait/feed in counties where this practice is allowed are still in place, including timing, location, quantity, and other requirements. Those interested in baiting/feeding should take time to be familiar with the associated regulations, found at dnr.wi.gov, keywords "baiting and feeding."

These outcomes apply equally to positive samples from free-roaming or captive animals. More information regarding current baiting and feeding rules in response to CWD detections can be found at keyword "CWD."

During the 2017 deer hunting season, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources staff will continue to sample deer within the Southern Farmland Zone and at select locations in the CWD-affected area. To learn more about the 2017 CWD surveillance plan, or for more information on CWD, search keyword "CWD." Hunters are reminded that the surveillance plan identifies where the Wisconsin DNR will be attempting to collect samples from deer however if hunters anywhere in the state are interested in having their animal tested, they should contact their local wildlife biologist for the county they are located.

Individuals may still feed birds and small mammals, provided feeding devices are within 50 yards of a human dwelling and at a sufficient height or design to prevent access by deer.

Check out this factsheet to see a complete list of what's new in 2017 [PDF].

________________________

 

Still time to submit deer hunter wildlife observations

MADISON - With the 2017 archery and crossbow deer hunting seasons well underway and the nine-day gun-deer season approaching, hunters are reminded to voluntarily record deer and other wildlife observations for the annual Deer Hunter Wildlife Survey.

Hunters are encouraged to record all hunting activity, even if no wildlife sightings occur during a hunt -- observations provide department staff with an index to measure abundance and help track population trends for Wisconsin's deer herd and other wildlife.

The smartphone app makes it easy for hunters to record what they see right from their stand.

During the first month of the 2017 survey, 263 hunting trips were recorded. So far, deer hunters have reported 175 bucks, 329 does, 251 fawns, and 60 unknowns, for an average of 0.65 deer seen per hour hunted. The most frequently observed species other than deer have been turkeys and raccoons.

At the end of each year, survey participants can receive a personalized summary of all recorded wildlife.

To access the survey, search the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov, for keywords "deer hunter wildlife." Observations can be submitted by smartphone, desktop, or mail. The current survey period ends January 2018.

________________________

 

Know your zones! Use the interactive Deer Management Unit map to learn the rules where you hunt

MADISON - Before heading into the woods this deer season, hunters should be sure to check out the online deer zone and management unit map on the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources website to see which counties are classified as split Deer Management Units in 2017 to correctly register their deer.

"It's very important that hunters properly register their deer if hunting in one of the split counties," said Kevin Wallenfang, DNR big game ecologist. "We saw some problems with this in previous years, so we added a number to the naming last year so hunters can understand that we are looking for information about a specific zone where they shot the deer, rather than in a habitat type."

A split DMU is one of nine counties that are divided between two separate Deer Management Zones. Wisconsin is broken into four Deer Management Zones, two of which are forest zones and two being farmland zones. When registering a deer harvested in a split DMU, hunters will need to indicate whether the deer was harvested in the Forest (Zone 1) or Farmland (Zone 2) portion of the county.

For more information regarding Deer Management Units, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "DMU."

"We need hunters to look at the regulations map and know exactly where they were when the question comes up while they register with GameReg," said Wallenfang. "It has long-term implications about deer management in their county."

The following counties are split between two different zones in 2017:

  • Adams;
  • Clark;
  • Eau Claire;
  • Jackson;
  • Juneau;
  • Marinette;
  • Monroe;
  • Oconto; and
  • Wood.

GameReg

Knowing which zone a deer was harvested from is important for registration. As a reminder, although hunters are no longer required to validate and attach tags to their deer carcass, registration continues to be a very important step in tracking deer harvest and managing Wisconsin's deer herd.

All harvested deer must be registered electronically by 5 p.m. the day after being recovered. GameReg is simple, fast and convenient for hunters. The system will prompt hunters to answer a series of questions, beginning with the deer tag number and the hunter's date of birth. Hunters will have two options for registering:

  • online at GameReg.wi.gov (fastest and easiest option); or
  • by phone at 1-844-426-3734 (1-844-GAME-REG).

Wild Wisconsin

Easy access to information is the key to a successful hunt, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is excited to announce the launch of a new podcast and web series - Wild Wisconsin.

Whether you prefer to watch all segments at once, catch one or two on the move, or listen to podcasts during your commute, Wild Wisconsin has it all. Topics range from public land hunting strategies to CWD and what it means for Wisconsin's deer herd.

In Episode 1, titled "Passport to Pursuit," hunters can learn about DMUs and much more.

For more information regarding electronic registration, search keyword "GameReg." For more information regarding deer hunting in Wisconsin, search keyword "deer."